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Aims: To provide an introduction to major artistic and literary movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, whose theories are fundamental to contemporary cultural thought; to develop the comparative study of genres; to explore the nature of visual images including art and photography , in relation to literary images. Content: A comparative analysis of the work of selected writers and artists within the modern period. Writers to be studied include: Proust, M.

Aims: To build on and develop understanding of key structures and institutions of French political life; to evaluate elements of change and continuity in the s and s using the framework of both presidencies, Mitterrand and Chirac; to develop note-taking and summarising skills in French; to develop listening and discussion skills in French; to encourage students to extract information and ideas from French source material. Key texts: A. Machin Developments in French Politics Palgrave, Aims: To study the development of cultural life in the German Federal Republic over the years when the two German states were separated by the Berlin Wall.

To refer in detail both to proseworks and films produced during this period and to more recent works taking stock of divided Germany from a post-unification perspective. To focus on a number of key cultural phenomena of these years: i personal experiences of life in the West, and especially in West Berlin, after the building of the Wall; ii the challenge to the self-confidence of the Federal Republic represented by the events of and their aftermath; and iii the struggle for gender equality in the context of the s and s.

Content: A framework of lectures will provide an overview of this era from the West German perspective and an introduction to the work of the authors and film-makers to be studied. The seminars will focus on the analysis of representative works of the period and the changing post-unification view of its significance. The unit is taught in German.

Aims: The unit is designed to build on the knowledge, understanding and skills acquired in the first year German Politics and Society units. It covers historical, political and social developments in both Germanies from the construction of the Berlin Wall in to its fall in Aims: To build on the textual and cultural awareness acquired in Year 1 and to provide an overview of Italian cultural production in the early 20th Century.

To develop students' skills in analysing and interpreting literary texts. Language skills are developed in this unit. Content: This core module will be based upon key examples of Italian 20th Century novel, poetry, and short story, from the primo Novecento to the Fascist period. Aims: This unit aims: 1 to provide a historical overview of the main political and social events of the post-war period in Italy; 2 to equip students with the appropriate analytical skills to permit a critical evaluation of the period.

Learning Outcomes: On completion of this unit students should: 1 be familiar with the main historical and political events of the post-war period; 2 be able to critically evaluate the principal interpretations of post-war Italian politics; 3 have in-depth knowledge about the role of the Cold War in Italy's post-war history. Content: The unit will pay attention to the following areas: the period of reconstruction; the effects of the Cold War on Italy's domestic affairs; collective movements of the ls and ls; the political system; the major political parties.

Aims: To introduce Year 2 students to some key literary texts of the period from the s to the s. Content: Three writers studied in key works : Chekhov, Blok, Zoshchenko. Aims: The main aim of this unit is to examine the character and evolution of the communist political order in the USSR from to , focusing particularly upon controversies of evidence and interpretation in order to develop skills in historical and political analysis.

A second aim is to help students improve their essay and seminar techniques. Content: The establishment of Bolshevik power under Lenin ; the New Economic Policy and the struggle for power in the Communist Party in the s; Stalin's drive for industrialization and rule by terror in the ss; the USSR in the Second World War; reform and its limits under Khrushchev and Brezhnev in the ss; the structure and problems of the Soviet political system in the early s. Key texts: G.

McAuley Soviet Politics 2nd edn Oxford: Aims: To present an overview of the development of Russian literature and film in these years; to further develop skills in literary analysis and criticism; to introduce the study of Russian film. Content: Two writers studied in key works : Kharms, Zoshchenko. Films by Eisenstein and others. Aims: The main aim of this unit is to examine the reform and collapse of Soviet communism and the subsequent construction of a post-communist political order in Russia, focusing particularly upon controversies of interpretation in order to develop skills in political analysis.

A second aim is to help students further improve their essay and seminar techniques.

Content: The origins, development and failure of Gorbachev's reform programme ; ethnic and social developments in the post-Stalin USSR and their bearing on the collapse of communism; Yeltsin's attempt to build a new political order in Russia; the impact of transition on Russian society; the character of postcommunist politics under Putin. Aims: To introduce students to key theories of European integration; to trace the development of the European Union; to examine current debates around the future of the European Union, including the impact of enlargement.

Content: The origins of the European Community; treaty reform in the s and s; institutions and the "democratic deficit"; the European Union as a world actor; moves towards a European constitution; citizenship; eastward enlargement. Aims: A course to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management. Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of the Unit students will be able to discuss their placement experience in the target language.

They will be able to operate effectively both orally and in writing in predictable business scenarios, write a CV and participate in job interviews. Teaching methods integrate a variety of forms of language learning through the exploitation of foreign language television broadcasts, audio-visual materials and a business language course text. This part of the course concentrates mainly on the practical language necessary for doing business, but also includes work on more theoretical themes such as the various types of company job application and interview practice.

Overall fluency and grammatical accuracy are practised throughout the course. Aims: The course continues to revive, develop and consolidate foreign language skills in order to enable students to operate effectively in the sphere of business and management.

Department of European Studies & Modern Languages, Unit Catalogue 2005/06

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this unit students will be able to read and understand business reports, understand and respond to business letters, understand and comment on business statistics, summarise business-related reports, understand and react to audio and video material related to business. The second part of the course is concerned with more real world material such as economics magazines and TV news items, on which the study of many aspects of the foreign business environment will be based. Continued emphasis on overall fluency and grammatical accuracy.

Content: This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering the appropriate grammatical structures and vocabulary and there will be continued emphasis on tones and pronunciation. Students are required to give short talks and undertake writing tasks in Chinese. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to France and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works.

There will be discussion and analysis in the target language of topics derived from teaching materials with the potential for small-scale research projects and presentations. Audio and video materials form an integral part of this study, along with newspaper, magazine and journal articles. Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which French is spoken.

Content: This unit contains a variety of listening, reading, speaking and writing tasks covering appropriate grammatical structures, vocabulary and pronunciation. Teaching materials will include reading passages from a wide variety of sources as well as topical and relevant audio and video material.

Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in German Audio and video laboratories are available to augment classroom work. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to German speaking countries and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works.

Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which German is spoken. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and write dialogues, reports and letters in Italian. Students are required to give short presentations, conduct brief interviews and undertake appropriate writing tasks in Japanese. Content: The course provides a survey of the major European political thinkers from Niccolo Machiavelli to Antonio Gramsci.

In addition, it considers how national economic interests shape the bargaining agenda between states within the EU as well as of those attempting to negotiate accession to the EU e. Content: The unit will address issues: EU membership, background and key data, from the point of view of both France AND Germany, perspectives on Europe - the EU as perceived by nations and their business communitites such as Germany, Italy and CEECs; the Europeanisation of economic policy making; social policy, political objectives and "bargaining" - setting the agenda.


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In addition, it considers how national economic interests shape the bargaiing agenda between states within the EU as well as of those attempting to negotiate accession to the EU e. Content: The unit will address issues: EU membership, background and key data, from the point of view of both Germany AND France, perspectives on Europe - the EU as perceived by nations and their business communities such as Germany, Italy and CEECs; the Europeanisation of economic policy making; social policy, political objectives and "bargaining" - setting the agenda.

Aims: The purpose of this unit is to challenge assumptions about European and national identities; to enable students to gain an understanding of the complexity, diversity and interrelated nature of European cultures, as reflected in the work of selected contemporary European writers and film-makers. Content: An exploration of shifting identities in contemporary Europe, through a variety of written and visual media, with particular reference to geographical and linguistic boundaries, and the themes of exile, migration, memory and forgetting.

Texts and films for analysis may include, but are not limited to: H. Fridriksson, Cold Fever, X. Koller, Journey of Hope; E. Reichart, February Shadows; J. Berger, To the Wedding. By the end of their placement year students should have enhanced skills in communication both written and oral , planning and time management, problem solving and analysis, and decision making. They should also have gained practical experience of working as part of a team. Content: Period of work experience. Aims: This first semester course is designed to examine a series of debates relating to the national political system in the United States, with emphasis on theories, institutions, informal processes, recent political history and some key policy issues.

The objective is to explore the American political system, enabling students to extend their understanding of some key concepts and themes in the study of politics. Learning Outcomes: Students should, at the end of the unit, be able to demonstrate understanding of a range of issues and topics relating to the study of American politics. Content: The course applies the concepts and theories of political science to the United states of America, assessing the role played by formal and informal political entities.

Notions of liberal democracy are assessed by reference to debates on the role of political parties, interest groups, elites and political culture on political outcomes in America. A number of case studies consider the political significance from a European perspective of questions of race and poverty, judicial review, and the American foreign policy process. Aims: This unit is designed to examine both theory and evidence relating to the political significance of the media of mass communication.

A key aim is to examine alternative theories of the political implications and effects of the mass media and then to apply these theories by examining a number of case studies. The unit will examine debates relating to aspects of the role of the media in liberal democratic politics, as well debates concerning the media's role in other contexts e.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate understanding of key theories, and be able to use them to explore the political significance of media institutions in a number of issue areas. Content: The course examines alternative theories of the political role of the mass media, and these to case studies. Topics include the Frankfurt School and mass culture, Marxist and pluralist notions of the media, the 'propaganda model', notions of public broadcasting, cinema and politics, the global role of the media, and the media and war.

Aims: To further students' knowledge of comparative politics and history by examining 20th century European non-democratic movements and regimes, with particular attention being paid to the relevance of the concept of 'totalitarianism' to communist and fascist regimes. Content: The concepts of authoritarianism and totalitarianism; the role of ideas and ideology in the genesis of European non-democratic movements and regimes; state and leadership in non-democratic regimes; violence, coercion and support; the collapse of non-democratic regimes.

Skills: Skills in critical analysis, conceptual thinking and effective communication in English are developed and assessed in this unit, along with practical teaching skills. Content: An introduction to basic linguistics with a practical focus on the skills and systems of the English language; teaching methodology the context for learning and teaching English as a foreign languagel, planning effective teaching, classroom skills ; selection and evaluation of resources and materials. Recommended background texts: 'Learning Teaching' Scrivener, J. Aims: The aim of the unit is to provide students with a grounding in debates about the social significance and 'effects' of film and television drama and documentary, in various industrial, national and global contexts.

Learning Outcomes: Students should attain a confidence in discussing and analysing the significance of film in particular political and historical contexts, and they should attain the ability to read and interpret film texts and to understand and assess the visual and other codes of film language in relation to political and social analysis. Content: The course draws on a number of theoretical approaches to film and the mass media, and draws on theoretical work on the political and social significance of film.

The course deals with questions of the construction and reception of political meaning in film and television drama, and at issues relating to film and national identity, film policy, political culture, censorship, propaganda, and the notion of documentary. Examples are drawn in particular, but not exclusively from American and European film. Teaching materials cover a wide range of cultural, political and social topics relating to Spain and may include short works of literature or extracts from longer works.

Students are actively encouraged to devote time and energy to developing linguistic proficiency outside the timetabled classes, by additional reading, links with native speakers and participating in events at which Spanish is spoken. Students will be able to continue to use and extend previously acquired receptive and productive language skills in a variety of contexts.

In addition, it considers how national economic interests shape the bargaining agenda between states within the EU as well as those attempting to negotiate accession to the EU eg Central and East European states or CEECs. On completion of the Unit students should be in a position to understand the differing agendas operating within member states under the above headings, together with their impact on Spain.

Content: The Unit will address issues such as :EU Membership, background and key data, from the point of view of Spain, Germany, France and Italy; perspectives on Europe - the EU as perceived by the nations and their business communites already cited together with CEECs; the Europeanisation of economic policy making; social policy; political objectives and "bargaining": setting the agenda. After following this course, the student will be familiar with the broad structures of employment relations in Spain and Britain, have a good understanding of basic terminology used in this field, and be able to make informed comparisions between the two national situations.

Aims: To introduce students to the study of contemporary Latin American politics and society. Content: An overview of contemporary Latin America which examines issues including: the legacy of colonialism, the rise of authoritarianism, ISI, modernisation and urbanisation, the impact of the Cuban revolution and the role of the US in Central America. Seminars provide a forum for assessed presentations, discussion and consolidation of the lectures as well as providing study skills sessions for argumentative essay writing.

Aims: To build upon the political, social and economic issues raised in Semester One and apply them to contemporary political developments within Latin America. Content: Analysis of the economic, social and political repercussions of economic transformation from the 's, and the limits of redemocratization. Case studies for political analysis include Colombia, Mexico and Chile. Seminars provide a forum for assessed presentation, discussion and consolidation of the lectures as well as providing study skills sessions for argumentative essay writing.

Aims: The unit is meant to provide a theoretical overview of the process of European Integration, particularly European economic policy making. The theoretical background in which the course is set is represented by the traditional political scientists' definition of political economy, mainly deriving from the tradition of International Relations and related theories of European integration. European integration and policies will be therefore assessed in the light of the different interpretative and heuristic tools provided by the theories analysed with special attention towards the explanation of change in the adoption of policy from the competing theoretical perspectives focusing on institutions, economic interests and ideological paradigms.

The policies considered range from competition policy, to EMU, unemployment and social and migratory policies. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course students should be able to demonstrate the following: 1. Content: Introduction: what is European political economy? Aims: To provide a theoretical framework for cultural analysis; to understand culture as a wide range of discursive practices; to understand culture as a site for the struggle over meaning and identity; to apply this conceptual paradigm to Modern and Contemporary Spain. Content: Cultural analysis, theoretically informed, of different practices and discourses in Modern and Contemporary Spain.

This unit is taught in Spanish. Spanish Cultural Studies. An Introduction. Contemporary Spanish Cultural Studies. London: Arnold, Aims: To build on EU in developing a theoretical framework for cultural analysis, understanding culture as a wide range of discursive practices, and understanding culture as a site for the struggle over meaning and identity. To continue to apply this conceptual paradigm to Contemporary Spain and to apply it in addition to a few Latin American case studies.

Content: Cultural analysis, theoretically informed, of different practices and discourses in Contemporary Spain and Latin America. Contemporary Latin American Cultural Studies. Aims: To examine the social, political and economic changes which have taken place in Berlin since the two halves of the divided city were reunited in and to investigate the ways in which that process has been depicted in recent German films.

Learning Outcomes: Students who complete the unit successfully will understand the continuing impact of the years of division on all aspects of life in today's Berlin and why the unification process has been particularly slow and complicated there. They will grasp what the specific issues faced by citizens in each half of the city are and how well the city government has coped with them.

They will have looked in detail at a representative selection of films focused on contemporary Berlin and developed their analytical and comparative skills in studying them. Aims: The unit aims to provide an overview of the New Women's Movement in Germany and identify significant areas of impact on German politics, culture and society since the late s. To study how and why gender role expectations and social practice have changed in areas such as the family, education, and work, and to assess whether women's struggle for 'equality' may be said to have been successful.

To examine changes and continuities over controversial issues such as abortion rights, sexuality, and violence. To take full account of German unification in order to appreciate the differences and similarities between women's experiences in the former East and West Germany. Through the close study of a number of key texts and films to explore issues of gender and identity raised in the unit as a whole. Learning Outcomes: Students who complete this unit successfully be able to demonstrate good understanding of controversial issues relating to women's social and cultural experience in Germany and to identify change over time in this respect.

They will be able to explain how key issues and areas of public and political debate have been reflected in selected literary texts and films. They will be familiar with representative literary texts and films in the context of German culture prior to and since unification and show critical awareness of issues of gender, identity and difference. Aims: The aim of this unit is to build on the experience already gained in Politics and Society by applying the expertise gained so far to the experience of women in the Second World War.

It will examine the ways in which French women developed strategies for survival and how some were drawn towards collaboration or resistance. It will analyse the importance of the Liberation and its impact on women's lives. The unit seeks to evaluate the conspicuously theatrical aspects of these plays, to consider why playwrights at this time chose to return to Classical mythology for their subject matter, and to establish the extent to which these works were allegorical in terms of their references to current affairs as distinct from or in addition to being purely theatrical and imaginative creations.

Learning Outcomes: A good knowledge of one of the most important and culturally productive periods of French drama, and a deeper understanding of the social and political issues in French domestic and foreign policy during the most traumatic period in the recent history of France. Aims: To explore the nature and significance of cinema in contemporary French culture, with particular reference to questions of identity and representation and the Auteur theory; to develop familiarity with critical concepts and analytical techniques, within the context of dominant theoretical debate.

Content: Topics for study include: the role and significance of cinema within French culture; the nature of first person viewpoint in film, in relation to issues of identity and representation; time and memory in film; filmic autobiography and the depiction of childhood; the Auteur theory and its significance; the nature of the filmic image and questions of technique; an introduction to film theory. Aims: To develop students' understanding of the political and historical background of the French experience of conflict in the twentieth century, and of the ways in which that experience has been articulated in written and visual terms, both documentary and creative.

Content: This unit will examine the history of conflicts in which France was involved in the twentieth century, with a principal focus on the period from thes to the s. Principal issues for discussion will include the morality and legitimacy of violence, and the status of memory in coming to terms with the past, and will involve discussion of themes such as armed combat, the occupation, resistance, commemoration, war crimes, and colonial war.

Aims: To build on the experience of Politics and Society by applying the expertise gained so far to an analysis of France coming to terms with the German Occupation of some sixty years on. Content: Chronological overview of key dates and events. Vichy and the Jewish Question. Collaboration and Resistance: key figures, events, and controversies.

Post-war trials. Aims: To develop students' awareness of cultural difference as preparation for living and working abroad on placement. Language skills are also developed in this unit. Aims: To build on the experience of French Politics and Society by applying the expertise gained so far to the issue of immigration in France; to examine social, political, economic and cultural changes affecting French society; to discuss the changes affecting the definition of French National identity in relation to the issue of immigration.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of the unit students will be able to discuss their placement experience in the target language. Content: Intensive language work with emphasis on aural comprehension and oral communication. Teaching materials integrate a variety of forms of language through the exploitation of foreign language television broadcasts, audio-visual materials and a business language course text.

Content: Further development of linguistic proficiency using the same methods as in Semester 1. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this unit, students should: 1 have in-depth knowledge of the major issues and trends in Italian society, politics and culture in these two crucial decades; 2 be familiar with theories relating to these issues; 3 be familiar with the major debates concerning these issues; 4 be able to respond in an informed manner to questions about these different issues and how they relate to each other.

Content: The economic miracle, internal migration, social and labour movements, the 'Opening to the Left', the growth of Communism, political extremism and terrorism, feminism, new voices in literature women, workers, youth and cinema. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this unit, students should: 1 have in-depth knowledge of the major issues in Italian politics and culture in the s; 2 be familiar with theories relating to these issues; 3 be familiar with the major debates on these issues; 4 be able to respond in an informed manner to questions about these different issues and how they relate to each other.

Aims: This option aims to develop students' understanding of the experiences of immigrants and their descendants, with a particular emphasis on the experiences of women. It will focus specifically on the ways in which French women of North African origin transcribe their mothers' stories of exile, and articulate their own position 'between' cultures, in a range of literature, film and painting. Content: This option will examine the representation of a variety of literal and metaphorical journeys between cultures in textual and visual material produced in the period from the s to the present day.

Principal themes to be considered include the experience of identity conflict for the descendant of immigrants, the discrepancy between the cultural attitudes of North African immigrant mothers and their daughters, the impact of factors such as gender, culture and ethnicity on the construction of identity, and the problem of defining 'home' in a postcolonial francophone context.

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The unit will focus on works such as Kerouani, D. Aims: To enhance the production of authentic and accurate written and spoken French; to develop comprehension and application of French grammatical and syntactic structure; to improve further skills in translation from French into English. Content: a. Translation: varieties of register, written translation from French into English, some English into French work. Spoken language: comprehension, oral presentation, course-related conversation. Content: Materials used in the course are drawn from across a range of socio-economic and legal texts drawn from the French press, with reference also to English press material, and European Community and other documents.

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Exploitation of these texts is aimed at increasing student awareness of presentational differences of the same material, soundness and elaboration of arguments etc. Students are instructed in the drafting of commercial correspondence in addition to work on CVs and accompanying documentation. Students are given specific assignments aimed at improving aural comprehension of spoken language, based on video and audio material relevant to the world of business and to the European business environment in particular.

Oral and interpersonal communication skills aer practised in various situations commonly experienced in the world of business, especially telephone skills, job interview techniques and presentation exercises. Skills in effective learning, CIT and adaptation to life in target countries are developed in this unit. In Spoken Language classes, students will be discussing a variety of topics related to culture and society in the German speaking countries. New Edition. Hueber: Aims: The unit pursues a dual aim. To improve students' communicative and listening skills and to expand their vocabulary, especially in economic, business and professional contexts.

To enable them to converse accurately, fluently and in an appropriate register. To develop more advanced skills in contemporary written communication with specific reference to material used in the core and interface courses; to focus on the business dimension of written communication in order to prepare students for industrial placements in a German company during their third year abroad. Learning Outcomes: The unit will familiarise students with written communication tasks appropriate to the world of business and management in Germany.

This may include summarisation, answering of questions and discussion of the topics presented to them. Also office skills simulations, such as answering the telephone, form a part of these classes. There are also free discussions which involve either a larger group or smaller sub-groups. Written communication materials consist primarily of socio-political and business texts. Exploitation of these texts is aimed at familiarising students with specific issues from the German business context.

Content: Written Language: prose and translation exercises from a variety of literary and non-literary texts; general essays. Spoken Language: role-playing, paired and group activities, dictation, summarisation of audio-visual texts in Italian, reading, conversation classes. Aims: To deepen knowledge of Russian grammar, expand lexis and develop translation skills in several registers. To give students practice in expressing themselves in writing. To improve aural comprehension and to develop fluency in spoken Russian at the level of everyday conversation. Content: Written Language: introduction of the remaining fundamental structures of Russian grammar followed by systematic review with exercises and drills drawn from a variety of sources; translations into Russian and English with discussion of grammatical points, lexis etc.

Essay writing in Russian with discussion of stylistic points and vocabulary. Spoken Language: small group conversation on a range of themes; role-playing; task-based use of audio-visual material. To assist vocabulary acquisition, work in written and spoken language will be organised around themes of geography and peoples, culture and recreation, social issues, history and politics.

Key text: T. Aims: To continue the production of accurate written and spoken Spanish; to provide further work in Spanish grammatical and syntactic structures; to develop further skills in translation from English into Spanish. Content: a Translation: varieties of register, written translation from English into Spanish, extempore translation, cloze tests. Learning Outcomes: On completion of the unit students will be familiar with written communication tasks appropriate to the world of business and management in Spain and able to apply them accordingly. Content: Oral communication classes may consist of aural comprehension exercises by using videos of current business affairs, usually taped from Spanish television.

Exploitation of these texts is aimed at familiarising students with specific issues from the Spanish business context. Content: Various European avant-garde movements, such as Futurism, Dada and Surrealism, will be examined through representative texts in French, including prose, poetry and manifestoes. Their relationship with the visual arts, photography and film will also be investigated. Key text: Baudrand, V. Using a range of sources including, films, tracts and the plethora of existing literature, areas for discussion will include in-depth analyses of the roles played by the numerous protagonists, examination of primary sources, assessment of the portrayal of the "events" in the media and literature, and an evaluation of the legacy of Aims: To examine the relations between France and the wider European area including the former USSR in the post-war world, with specific emphasis on developments since the late s.

The general focus will be the broad field of international relations which will be narrowed down to three specific and inter-related areas: economic and commercial interests; foreign policy and diplomacy; military policy and security. They will also have improved their ability to engage with and conduct academic discourse in French.

Content: The unit will examine the tensions which have always existed in French policy towards Europe between a nationalist and an internationalist impulsion. In the three areas noted above, protectionism, individualism and national independence have constantly vied with liberalism, international cooperation and alliance solidarity. At the same time, since the end of the s, France has been faced with a new dichotomy; whether to prioritise the deepening of the Community of 12 the Maastricht process or, on the contrary, to pursue the old Gaullist vision of a broader Europe "from the Atlantic to the Urals".

Particular emphasis will be placed throughout the course on the complex but crucial role played by Franco-German relations. Four hours will be devoted to each of the following: 1. The historical background to France's relations with Europe. France and the EEC French foreign and defence policy The lack of these values such as solidarity and basic and human rights arguably contributed to the financial and refugee crises and their perseverance — which were both really political crises.

Rather than discussing the financial Union and a values Union separately, bringing the dual reforms of the Common European Asylum System and of the EU budget system together might allow for a stronger political Union altogether. You read this long post all the way down. Thanks, much obliged! Now, let me ask you something: Do you enjoy reading Verfassungsblog? If you do, please support us so that we can keep up our work and stay independent.

I wonder, whether any of the noumerous legal experts will deal with the question, that the presently valid Dublin Regulation is simply not followed by some EU member states and that this behaviour has no negative consequences at all.

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Olaf Kleist. Valuing the values and diluting the dilemma: a call for an EU framework for fundamental rights. All the best, Max Steinbeis. We welcome your comments but you do so as our guest. Please note that we will exercise our property rights to make sure that Verfassungsblog remains a safe and attractive place for everyone. We expect comments to be matter-of-fact, on-topic and free of sarcasm, innuendo and ad personam arguments. Have an Access Token? Enter your access token to activate and access content online. Please login and go to your personal user account to enter your access token.

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