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Success by design

Uses a case study approach to teach students to recognize when a legal issue presents itself in situations involving students, faculty, or administration. Registration Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students. Uses the philosophical and sociological grounding of higher education research to provide guidance on decision-making in ambiguous and complex higher education organizations.

Higher education is undergoing rapid transformation in the 21st century, due in large part to emerging digital technologies. This course explores the changing landscape, including face-to-face and online teaching and learning, student affairs, infrastructure, and administration. Combining reading, writing, viewing, and hands-on learning, students examine issues through the content and lens appropriate for their discipline and learning goals. Overview of scholarship on teaching and learning in higher education.

Focuses on ways students learn, how learning can be improved, and different methods of conducting research into teaching and learning. Examines the inequitable structural systems that produce unequal access to higher education. Explores the meaning of social justice in higher education, and emphasizes policy, administrative processes, and educational practices. Focusing on the leadership of higher education and the role leaders play in institutional transformation, this course explores the complex social and political environments and the current and future trends of higher education.

This focus occurs through the foundational grounding of leadership theory and research. Students will be challenged to employ multiple perspectives of leadership in higher education. Intended as a toolkit for the understanding and creation of evidence-based analysis of public policy issues at all levels of governance, this course examines examples of policy research and analysis prompted from discussion around higher education policy issues.

Examines educational assessment and evaluation practices and methods. Students critique and design an evaluation study and an evaluation report. Reviews ethical issues and impact of assessment and evaluation for students, employees, and programs. Explores the internationalization of higher education through various lenses including administration, student services, curriculum integration, study abroad, and branch campus development. Provides concepts of organization and administration in contemporary institutions from macro to micro perspectives.

Introduction

Studies theory and practices of the organization as it relates to governance, structure, and management of the institution. Participation in research or assessment study under the supervision of a faculty member. Written report required. Covers current topics in higher education. Notes: May be repeated when topic is different. May be repeated within the degree. Recommended Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program or permission of instructor. This capstone course guides students in the creation of a learning and professional practice portfolio. The portfolio is a compilation of academic work and other forms of educational evidence assembled for the purpose of 1 evaluating coursework quality, learning progress, and academic achievement; and 2 determining whether students have met learning standards or other academic requirements for courses and the program.

Recommended Prerequisite: Students must be in the last semester of their course work. Under the supervision of a faculty advisor and project evaluation committee, students create a project from existing literature. Project must be a deliverable with a practical application related to student development and higher education. Original research related to student development or higher education. Provides a review of sophisticated research methodologies commonly used in higher education including collection and analysis procedures, ethics, and decision-making.

Alignment of research questions, method selection, data collection and analysis procedures, implications, and writing are examined.

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Registration Restrictions: Enrollment is limited to students with a major in Education Community College. Enrollment is limited to Graduate level students. Enrollment limited to students in a Doctor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Examines the philosophical and epistemological foundations that guide qualitative inquiry. Trustworthy data collection methods and means of analysis are stressed and practiced. Develops ability to conduct applications of quantitative methods in higher education research.

Reinforces skills acquired in previous research courses. Learning occurs through reading assignments, hands - on experience in using a computer program for data analysis, and application activities. Students will identify and report on quantitative methods used in published research, analyze data, and provide written results. Key issues and moments in the history of higher education are examined as a way to understand current structures, cultures, policies, and purposes.

Historical perspective will also be used to consider the near future of higher education. Students will examine current trends and possible futures for a specific topic by doing historical research on the issue. Supervised internship at a community college, four-year college or university, or nonteaching higher-education setting such as a government agency or administrative office.

Develops skills applicable to college teaching or higher education administration or policy. Students must complete a minimum of hours of work and participate in internship seminar. Notes: Students must contact the program at least one semester before enrolling. May be repeated within the term for a maximum 6 credits. Recommended Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program; approval of advisor and internship coordinator, 18 credits of graduate course work.

Overall, lecturers scored significantly higher on the concept-changing student-focused CCSF scale than the information-transmitting teacher-focused ITTF scale of the ATI Trigwell and Prosser, , indicating that lecturers more often adopt a student-focused approach in order to facilitate conceptual change in students with regard to the module they teach, rather than engaging in a more shallow, information-transmitting approach. The significant negative correlation observed between ITTF and its subscales and years of teaching showed that those with fewer years of teaching endorsed approaches that are more teacher-focused and information-transmitting.

These findings also indicate that teachers tend to evaluate their teaching expectations in the context of their teaching experiences, as those with more teaching experiences endorsed such approaches less. Trend-significant positive correlations were observed between year in which students are taught and lecturers' scores on the CCSF and scores on the CCSF-Strategy subscale. These findings indicate that there are associations between the approaches lecturers take i.

On the other hand, increasing years at university and cumulative learning experiences, the scores on the ITTF and its subscales decrease, meaning that lecturers endorse these teaching approaches less often. The positive relationships between the CCSF and the years in which students are studying supports these findings, as these associations show that lecturers tend to increase the student-focused, concept changing approaches in later years of study.

This is in line with literature showing that lecturers adapt their approaches to teaching in responses to students' requests but also in response to students' learning and achievements Trigwell and Prosser, , ; Prosser and Trigwell, Such development is important to prepare students for post-graduate studies or for employment.

It also shows that such development takes into account that students who come to university straight from A-levels, or college and who, as shown here, expect a teaching style more reflective of one they are used to, have an opportunity to gradually develop a more independent learning style. However, Fraser and Killen showed that lecturers actually expected students to be independent, self-motivated and self-efficient right from the beginning of their university degree, a finding which is in-part supported by our current observations.

Lecturers endorsed positive student engagement related to lecture attendance and participation in lectures far more than negative engagements e. Positive engagement with the university culture and a lecture, rather than a classroom, environment was endorsed by students, who also recognized regular attendance at lectures would be expected of them when at university.

This seems to contradict findings by Fraser and Killen , who reported that students undervalued the importance of regular lecture attendance. A mis-match between students' and lecturers' academic expectations may result in communication break-down or to uncertainties about their respective roles.

For example, students may feel that there is little that they can do to succeed and lecturers may not be aware of how they can improve the situation. In the long-term this could impair effective teaching and pedagogy and might lead to decreased student satisfaction, poor academic performance, and increased dropout rate Fraser and Killen, Current findings suggest a potential for common understanding, e. This is in line with previous research e. Yet, there are also quite significant differences, suggesting disparate views of what a successful academic career, or successful academic progression, means.

Talbot reported that the most influential personality traits in relation to academic persistence and achievement appeared to be intrinsic motivation and students' level of cognitive categorization. The importance of understanding whether or not there is a mis-match between the expectations that students hold of university teaching and learning, and the expectations that staff have of students is related to the fact that the majority of students who end up dropping out of university do so in year 1, and most likely at the end of term 1, or the beginning of term 2 Ozga and Sukhnandal, It appears as if males are more likely to drop-out than females, hence it may be important to look at gender differences with regards to expectations.

The low number of males recruited in this study does not, however, allow for a rigorous assessment of gender differences. Previously, different academic expectations between males and females have also been reported Wells et al.


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Students are particularly vulnerable at the beginning of the course; hence they may require more support. Research has shown that the introduction of orientation courses has resulted in higher academic achievement and lower drop-out rates Wilke and Kuckuck, The identification of students at-risk of failure, but also assessments of students' expectations and their satisfaction as well as offering tutoring services and study skills development programs have proven to be successful in maintaining, if not improving, retention rates Cook and Leckey, Therefore, considering the different perspectives would help in attempting to narrow the gap between discrepant expectations.

Helping students understand the apparent changes between studying at secondary school and studying at university would allow for more realistic expectations from the beginning, including a reduction in anxiety and a potential for better academic success. From a lecturers' perspective, helping students to become more aware of, and to understand, effective, and progressive learning habits and learning environments Fraser and Killen, would increase their academic potential and ensure more successful degree completions.

Specifically, younger students which in this study made up the majority of the sample, expected teaching to be much more information-transmitting, facilitating the more shallow learning approaches they are familiar with, or successfully applied, at college. Nonetheless, the number of new undergraduates in the UK reached record levels in , with UCAS reports revealing increasing number of students from disadvantaged backgrounds, mature students as well as students from ethnic minorities and those who are first-generation of attending university entering higher education.

To ensure their retention, progress and ultimately success is reliant upon closing the gap between the differing expectations hold amongst students and lecturers. Students voluntarily filled out the questionnaires, rather than it being a compulsory requirement for a course, for example. It has thus to be considered that the sample is likely biased toward more engaged and proactive students in the first place. No record of whether students would be considered to be of a traditional, compared to non-traditional, background with regards to university education was obtained, a fact that likely could have impacted results.

Although we recorded if students were entering their first-ever degree course, or if they had previously entered a course, the numbers were too discrepant in order to compare them in any meaningful way. In future, university education background, i.


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It might be useful to more actively recruit those who had previously entered a degree course, and to compare their expectations of university teaching and learning against those who had never entered a degree programme before. Overall, the sample size is modest, and given that the sample was obtained primarily from only one programme BSc Psychology —which traditionally has a very imbalanced male:female ratio—in future, studies should recruit across different university programmes to balance the number of male and female students who are being asked about their expectations of university.

The imbalance in male:female ratio could confound findings, given the previously discussed gender differences with regards to academic expectations Seifert et al. Recruitment of a more evenly balanced sample of male and females could be arranged by assessing degree courses that may be unevenly represented across genders e.

Differences between this cohort and the younger student cohort should be viewed with caution. Future research, however, should attempt to increase the number of mature students in order to assess such differences in detail. Higher education is an extremely important and life-changing time for most students; students invest not only financially, but also emotionally as well as time and effort. Therefore, ensuring that students make the most of their university experience, and leave university with the best degree possible requires clear communication of the expectations that both parties, students and lecturers, have of each other.

What can be drawn from this study is that there remains a need to more clearly communicate these mutual expectations. From a lecturer's perspective, reiterating the active and self-governing role that students need to play in their university education might resolve in students being more aware of the fact that they would need to accept full responsibility for their own academic success and acknowledge that their lecturers are only one of many resources for achieving success.

Students need to be made aware of the fact that they need to monitor their own progress toward completing their degree Tinto, Furthermore, it needs to be acknowledged that students and lecturers have joint responsibility for student success: a first stage in accepting such responsibility would be to gain a better understanding of the complex processes that seem to influence students' academic success. Differences in student and lecturer perception and expectation make it difficult to appropriately assess learning and teaching.

Future research should therefore attempt to further integrate students' expectations about the factors that may influence their success with their actual performance Fraser and Killen, SH: designed and conducted the study data collection and analysis and wrote the initial draft of the manuscript; NR: conducted a literature search and wrote the second draft of the manuscript.

Both authors contributed to the final draft. The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Journal List Front Psychol v. Front Psychol. Published online Jan Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. This article was submitted to Educational Psychology, a section of the journal Frontiers in Psychology. Received Jun 30; Accepted Dec 7.

The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author s and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Abstract Transition from school to university can cause concern for many students.

Higher and Postsecondary Education | Teachers College Columbia University

Keywords: student expectations, lecturer expectation, UK higher education, University education, teaching styles, teaching experience. Student expectations of studying at university A common expectation of students is that a university education will enhance their academic and vocational prospects, but also provide opportunities to become independent and to enjoy themselves Lowe and Cook, ; Kandinko and Mawer, Lecturers' expectations of university students There is a paucity of research assessing what lecturers expect of students when they first enter university and very few studies have investigated the perceptions of both students and lecturers regarding factors that influence academic success Killen, ; Fraser and Killen, Methods Participants Data were available for 77 students enrolled in either the Single Honours Psychology Programme or a Joint Honours Degree Programme with Psychology being one of the two subjects studied.

Measures Students completed a questionnaire that was created specifically for this study but which was based on the survey used by Lowe and Cook, Data analysis Analysis of student questionnaire Total scores for the student questionnaire were calculated and subsequently, emerging clusters were generated. Results Student expectations questionnaire—summary of endorsed statements Total scores for the student questionnaire were calculated, then emerging clusters were generated.

Table 1 Themes clusters assessed in the student questionnaire. Reasons for attending university Academic aptitude Teaching expectation Ambition Academic aptitude struggles Expectation of Teaching being facilitating student-focused Lack of other opportunities Other struggles Financial, Emotional, Support Expectation of Teaching being information transmitting teacher-focused Social factors Expectation of Learning being similar to college high-school Perceived status and expectations. Open in a separate window. Student expectations questionnaire—cluster analysis The numbers of clusters were predetermined to be 3—this was based on an initial Agglomerative Clustering method squared Euclidean Distance.

Table 6 Summary of results from the dispersion analysis. F p -value Academic struggles Table 7 Summary of results for Group differences when comparing students aged 18—19 vs. Figure 1. Figure 2. Correlations between years of teaching experience and scores on the ITTF scales. Discussion This study aimed to assess what incoming students and lecturers expect of learning and teaching at university. Staff expectations Approaches to teaching inventory Overall, lecturers scored significantly higher on the concept-changing student-focused CCSF scale than the information-transmitting teacher-focused ITTF scale of the ATI Trigwell and Prosser, , indicating that lecturers more often adopt a student-focused approach in order to facilitate conceptual change in students with regard to the module they teach, rather than engaging in a more shallow, information-transmitting approach.

Application to students' university experience A mis-match between students' and lecturers' academic expectations may result in communication break-down or to uncertainties about their respective roles. Limitations Students voluntarily filled out the questionnaires, rather than it being a compulsory requirement for a course, for example. Conclusion Higher education is an extremely important and life-changing time for most students; students invest not only financially, but also emotionally as well as time and effort.

Author contributions SH: designed and conducted the study data collection and analysis and wrote the initial draft of the manuscript; NR: conducted a literature search and wrote the second draft of the manuscript. Conflict of interest statement The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. References Briggs A. Building bridges: understanding student transition to university.

Problems of retention in tertiary education. Student non-attendance in higher education. A phenomenon of student apathy or poor pedagogy? Level 3 5 , 1— Parents as educational models and definers. Marriage Fam. Do expectations meet reality? A survey of changes in first year student opinion. Understanding the Problems of Transition into Higher Education. First year student expectations: results from a university-wide student survey. Improving student retention in higher education: improving teaching and learning. Factors influencing academic success or failure of first-year and senior university students: do education students and lecturers perceive things differently?

South Afr. Voluntary use of online lecture notes: correlates of note use and note use as an alternative to class attendance. Patterns of integration, commitment and student characteristics and retention among younger and older students. League Table for Psychology. Homophily, selection, and socialization in adolescent friendships. Student Expectations and Perceptions of Higher Education. Learning how to be a successful student: exploring the impact of first-year seminars on student outcomes.

First-Year Exp. Students Transit. Differences between students' and lecturers' perceptions of factors influencing students' academic success at university. University students' perceptions of the learning environment and academic outcomes: implications for theory and practice. Higher Educ. An institutional response to changing student expectations and their impact on retention rates. Policy Manage. Mind the gap: are students prepared for higher education?

Unqualified Leavers MA, University of Ulster. Understanding Student Transition to University: the expectations of essay writing for students and staff. Toward a cognitive social learning reconceptualization of personality. They give us homework! Transition to higher education: the case of initial teacher training. Undergraduate non-completion: developing an explanatory model.

Do first-year college students' expectations align with their first-year experiences? Great expectations sixth-formers' perceptions of teaching and learning in degree-level English. Arts Hum. Personality correlates and personal investment of college students who persist and achieve. Leaving College. Approaches adopted by teachers of first year university science courses. Development and use of the approaches to teaching inventory. End of Cycle Report Gender and realized educational expectations: the roles of social origins and significant others.

Closing the Gap: an exploration of first-year students' expectations and experiences of learning. A longitudinal study of the effects of a freshman seminar. Freshman Year Exp. Retention and Student Success in Higher Education. Support Center Support Center. External link. Please review our privacy policy. Expectation of Teaching being facilitating student-focused.

An Investigation of First-Year Students' and Lecturers' Expectations of University Education

Other struggles Financial, Emotional, Support. Expectation of Teaching being information transmitting teacher-focused. Expectation of Learning being similar to college high-school. Reasons for attending university ambition, drive, motivation I came to university because I wanted ….


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Perceived status and expectations. Anticipated obstacles academic aptitude struggles I worry that. I may have made the wrong decision to go to university. I find it difficult to cope with being away from home. Expectations of lecturers being facilitative My expectations about attending university are that. I will have to do a lot of independent learning.